Tag Archives: new year’s resolutions

18 for 2018

Thanks to Gretchen Rubin and her sister Elizabeth Craft for this excellent idea, gleaned from their Happier podcast. Rubin and Craft suggest setting eighteen goals for 2018—not the usual vague resolutions, so quickly abandoned, but rather smaller, concrete, achievable goals. I’ve noticed a theme as I compile my list: making better use of the resources I already have.

Here are my eighteen goals for 2018:

  1. Write another romance novel. (I’ve already started)
  2. Write another mystery novel.
  3. For fun, and to help my own writing, I’ll read and review books by at least six new-to-me romance authors, six new mystery authors, and six new women’s fiction authors.
  4. Attend one big writing conference.
  5. Take guitar lessons. Since getting a guitar in May, I’ve only learned chords. It’s time to learn scales, finger picking, some cool blues techniques.
  6. Take dance lessons. For years, I’ve been saying I want to learn basic ballroom dancing, and Hubs is willing to try.
  7. Take golf lessons. I’m a baby beginner, but I have a nice set of clubs and access to affordable golf courses, so why not? Hubs loves golf, and I’d like to share this with him more often.
  8. Incorporate more exercise into my writing hours. I’ll use the Pomodoro technique and monitor my progress until it becomes a habit, however long that takes. Sitting is the new sugar, eh? Or is it the new smoking? In any case, I sit too much.
  9. Acquire or make 18 snazzy garments, clothes I could wear to a book signing. Dump 18 seldom-worn garments.
  10. Publish a blog post each week. I pay for the hosting, so I might as well take advantage of it to practice my writing.
  11. Set up my author webpage.
  12. Get a professional author photo.
  13. Do the online Spanish lessons I’m paying for at least three times per week. Me gusta aprender idiomas.
  14. Use the gym at least three times per week. I love going there, but I tend to procrastinate. Again, if I’m going to pay for it, I might as well use it.
  15. Stretch every day. I tend to skimp on this at the end of a workout—not a good idea for an older person who spends most of her day sitting.
  16. At least fifteen minutes of real conversation with Hubs every day—talking about logistics and daily tasks doesn’t count. Let’s get metaphysical, philosophical, or maybe just silly.
  17. Query the everloving shit out of my recently-completed mystery. Someone wants this story!
  18. Explore the Pacific Northwest. I’ve been living here for three years now, but haven’t yet visited much of it.

There you go! Care to share any of your goals for 2018?

Connecting in the New Year

I got this marvelous idea from Gretchen Rubin’s excellent podcast Happier with Gretchen Rubin. If you haven’t already, you should check it out on iTunes. Rubin and her sister, Elizabeth Craft, discuss ideas from her book Better Than Before: What I Learned About Making and Breaking Habits–to Sleep More, Quit Sugar, Procrastinate Less, and Generally Build a Happier Life. Rather than create the usual list of (ignored by February) new year’s resolutions, Rubin suggests picking a one-word theme to focus on in the coming year.

Choosing my theme for 2017 was surprisingly easy: CONNECT.

Both my vocation and my avocation require lots of solitary office time, and that suits my mostly-introverted nature. I could easily spend a whole day writing and reading—until I find myself feeling lonely and itchy for actual human contact, an itch that social media doesn’t quite scratch. And yet, when I’m with others, I sometimes find it hard to give them my full attention. I could do much better here, and would be happier for it.

And then there’s the news. Oh my, how recent events tug on my worry strings. How they stretch their tendrils of gloom through my dreams. I sit at my desk, picking at the virtual scabs and retweeting dismay, which only magnifies the miasma of impending doom. I don’t want to waste four years huddled under a rain cloud like Eeyore.

And so, in 2017 I’ll focus on connecting—with other writers, with my students and colleagues, with activists who are doing something other than moan, with not-so-likeminded people, to remind them of our shared humanity, with loved ones I see too seldom, and with the fascinating people who cross my path each day. Keeping this one-word mantra in mind will help focus my efforts: connect. There’s no warmer comfort than knowing, deep down in your bones, that you’re not alone.

What’s your focus for the coming year? Can you boil it down to just one word?

Reflections on Retirement, Six Months In

And now we have arrived at what Germans call  die Zeit zwischen den Jahren, or “the time between the years,” that quiet period between Christmas and New Year’s when we sit back, munch cookies, burp, and reflect on the glories and challenges of the past year, while planning our goals for the next.

2014 was a truly momentous year for me: I retired after a 27-year teaching career; I came back to the U.S. after living in Germany for nearly 30 years; I married a very good man and acquired a most excellent extended family; I made some real progress toward my long-frustrated goals and desires. Holy cow!

Duncan & Rhonda get married

2015 will be the first calendar year in which I’m fully retired – well, from teaching – well, for money. I’ll soon begin volunteering at a family literacy program that helps adults – in this case, mothers – reach their goal of a high school diploma and, for some, preparation for college. There are so many good causes here that need volunteers; a retired person could easily fill her days with satisfying work outside the home if she so desired. I don’t. Part of my transition into retirement has been lolling about in my jammies, enjoying my newfound freedom like a pig rolling in luscious mud. After so many years of doing for others, I’ve been enjoying this unrepentant selfishness. I still wake up most mornings, realize that I don’t have to get out of bed until I’m good and ready, and grin in amazement and delight.

Time is really what we sell when we work, and what we long for during those working years – time in abundance, time to fulfill our plans, write our novels, paint our tableaux, build our homes, explore the world, take care of ourselves the way we’ve taken care of children and clients and students and pets and… And the dominant note of this phase of life – sweet, blessed retirement from daily paid work – is the keen awareness that time is limited. I’ll be active and healthy for – what? – maybe twenty more years? A bit more if I’m lucky, but I’ve also entered the phase of life in which friends my age begin to die of cancer, heart disease, the various ailments that take us away too soon. So I try not to waste this precious, vital time on mindless time-sucks like TV marathons, errands, or too much social media. Wow – what could I have accomplished if I’d take this attitude twenty years earlier?

Recently I spent some time with some people in their 30s and early 40s, and what I took away from that exchange is that they’re terrified – of growing older, of no longer being the cool kids, of losing their youthful invincibility, of entering that slide into – what? What are you so afraid of, kiddos? Clearly, these bright, lovely young people fear some terrible fate that awaits when they are no longer wired in to the latest electronic gadgets, when they no longer dance ‘til dawn, when their knees and backs complain after athletic feats of derring-do. I want to take them in my arms and reassure them that life is indeed worth living past youth – that their older years will most likely be a blast! But they wouldn’t believe me, so indoctrinated are they by the Cool Kids’ Creed. (It must be posted somewhere on some social media site I’m too old and uncool to access.)

So the best I can do for these frightened young people is to give them a good example of an older woman having fun in retirement. I’ve no intention of trying to crack the Cool Kids’ Code – after all, it’s intended to keep my ilk out of the clubhouse, and I would look mighty silly in one of those floppy hipster beanies. But soon these youngsters will venture a look out of the clubhouse and notice that – can it be? – there are older people out there having fun! That’s a good goal for 2015, I think: I shall set a good example of a retired person enjoying her life. Happy New Year, everyone!